Friday, April 8, 2011

Homegrown Terrorism and the American Muslim Community

By
Sean Ewart


*Comments regarding NYPD spying on Muslim Student Associations follow the article*

“You could say that 80-85 percent of mosques in this country are controlled by Islamic fundamentalists... This is an enemy living amongst us." Joe McCarthy could have said it. In fact it was New York congressman Peter King who uttered these words in 2004. In keeping with the spirit of this statement, King is using his position as chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee to wage a war of bigotry against American citizens who follow the religion of Islam. There is a growing number of American Citizens who are resorting to terrorism. They often operate alone, though some have worked as the American wing of foreign terrorist groups as did about a dozen Americans who were arrested in Yemen last year. Domestic radicalization is an active threat, and there is no doubt that Islamic fundamentalists are largely responsible. Proof positive is the fact that nearly all of the 125 American citizens who have been convicted of terrorism since 2001 have been either Muslim, Muslim converts, or were working on behalf of Islamic organizations. Indeed, it is worrisome that even 8% of American Muslims believe that suicide bombing is acceptable in the defense of Islam (13% if you include those who think suicide bombing is sometimes acceptable) – it only takes one, after all (Rand). There is, however, something deeply troubling about the backlash against Muslim citizens. The issue of homegrown terrorism needs to be addressed – and soon – but surely we can find a better way to do it than by holding Red Scare style congressional hearings and ostracism.

Saturday, April 2, 2011

$100 Million Cut to SUNY Approved

By
Sean Ewart

Governor Cuomo's attempt at passing an on time budget was thoroughly successful as, a full day before the April 1st deadline, the New York state legislature passed their budget, cuts and all. Throughout the government, lawmakers praised the budget as a reflection of the state's fiscal realities. Cuomo has repeatedly said that the state needs to “cut the waste” out of its departments and the $135.2 billion budget has been accomplished through proposed prison closures, department mergers, state job cuts, and by slashing education and healthcare budgets. This year's cut to SUNY is an additional $100 million added on top of the $600 million over the past three years – about 35% of SUNY's total operating budget. In the words of Assemblywoman Lifton, SUNY was state funded, then state assisted, and is now state located.